Benefits of Running

When running at identical speeds, a trained distance runner runs at a lower percentage of aerobic capacity than an untrained athlete does, even though the oxygen uptake during the run will be similar for both athletes. 


The demarcation between running and jogging depends on the individual’s level of fitness. Independent of fitness it becomes far more economical from an energy viewpoint to change from walking to running when your speed exceeds 8km/hr (5 mph). Above 8km/hr the oxygen intake for a walker exceeds the oxygen intake of a runner. At 10km the walker’s oxygen (O2) uptake is 40 ml/kg/min compared to 35 ml/kg/min for the runner.

Body mass can predict energy expenditure with reasonable accuracy when running on a firm level surface (road, track or grass). The amount of calories required to run 1 km equals your weight in kg – a runner of 78 kg will burn 78 Calories/km. This amounts to 15.6 liters of oxygen (O2) consumed per kilometer (1 liter of O2 = 5 Calories)

The following table provides the amount of calories you will burn per minute for ranges of body mass (weight) and speed when you run on a firm level surface (road, track or grass).

.

Speed Body Mass (Kg)
km/hr 55 65 75 85 95
8 7.1 8.3 9.4 10.7 11.8
9 8.1 9.8 11.0 12.6 14.4
10 9.1 10.8 12.2 13.6 15.3
11 10.2 11.8 13.1 14.7 16.6
12 11.2 12.8 14.1 15.6 17.6
13 12.1 13.8 15.0 17.0 18.9
14 13.3 15.0 16.1 17.9 19.9
15 14.3 15.9 17.0 18.8 20.8
16 15.4 17.0 18.1 19.9 21.9

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